What the Chromebook/Android Merge Means for Classroom eReading

Google announced that they’re effectively merging compatibility between the ChromeOS and Android by making Google Play applications available on Chromebooks. Right now only a select number of Chromebook models have full access to the  Play Store, with many more devices to be added throughout the rest of 2016 and 2017. The list of supported Chromebooks may be viewed here.

Android-compatible Chromebooks  will be able to download applications that can view DRM-protected eBooks with the extension .acsm. All eBooks produced by major publishers are required to be protected by DRM and opening up the ecosystem to other players means that readers can install their books on their Chromebooks – whether they’re purchased from Adams Book Company or another supplier. Until now, Chromebooks could only access eBooks purchased from Google Play, which no longer has a feasible classroom distribution model or from a retailer with a web viewer. The latter still required access to the internet, which can be problematic. Instead of being restricted to reading applications with web viewers, Chromebook educators will have access to a wider range of reading applications and can choose a tool that best fits the needs of his or her classroom.

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Reading Applications for DRM-Protected eBooks

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Most major publishers require that digital formats of their titles be protected by digital rights management (DRM) when they’re distributed to readers.  K12 Student Direct utilizes the industry standard, Adobe DRM, when protecting EPUBs and PDFs on behalf of publishers. We’ve compiled a list of applications which are compatible with DRM and outlined their features so that you can take full-advantage of using a non-proprietary format.

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Super-Smooth Guide to Integrating Digital Learning (Part Three: Best Practice Wrap Up and Getting Everyone on Board)

Admin-UserSo far in our series on best practices to implement a digital curriculum, we have covered what to look for in the features of a digital product, and how to predict success based on the needs of the school community. In this wrap-up post coinciding with Digital Learning Day, we will emphasize the importance of establishing proper groundwork for a digital transition as well as communicating to help set the expectations of faculty, students, and parents.

Consider possible obstacles

Looking out for potential glitches before implementing a new program shouldn’t only apply to technology; schools should do the same analysis with their human assets: the community.

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Super-Smooth Guide to Integrating Digital Learning (Part Two: Outline Your Objectives)

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In our last post, we outlined the different types of eBooks that schools might be interested in, and how their variable access and compatibility standards need to be accounted for in order to ensure a successful implementation.

Now we are going to look at another aspect of planning a product adoption: prioritizing your objectives.

Since different products offer different strengths, this method will help you see where a product aligns with your expectations. Consider which of the following advantages is most important to your school:

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Get Started with Tablets in Your Classroom

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A Tablet is Not a Computer

This is the most helpful premise to have when integrating a tablet into a classroom and one that often gets ignored. The purpose of a tablet is best thought of as a consumption and creation device, not a small computer. They are meant as a compliment to the computer, not a replacement.  Seeking to make one’s tablet a computer may lead to frustration as well as discount the strengths of the tablet. Start by considering what the tablet can do and how it can compliment your curriculum to engender active learning. Read on for great classroom tablet tips